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Saturday, 08 October 2016 14:38

3 Ways To Overcome Panic Attacks Today

Before we get going any further let’s look at what the definition is of a panic attack:

 

A quick type in Google and we can find the following definition “A sudden overwhelming feeling of acute and disabling anxiety” (Google Search, 2016)

 

For many of you, that suffer from panic attacks I’m sure you can relate to the above definition. I know the above definition was true for me many years ago when I seemed to suffer from constant panic attacks. Panic attacks make you feel exhausted, tired, Apathetic in nature and one almost feels like surrendering to the inevitable daily trudge off the day. We surrender our control to the world and let the world do what it wants with us. We feel abandoned by society because society doesn’t understand our issue and in many cases can’t help us with our issues. Sadly you can waste thousands on so-called alternative treatments and read hundreds of books without seeming to make any noticeable movement forward.

 

I know this because this is how my own journey started. I grew ever frustrated by the lack of knowledge and results from so-called CBT, Counselling, Psychotherapy and trying this technique and that technique. However, I’m determined that no one else should have to go through the same experience and feel like they’re stuck in a thick sticky quagmire. Today I’d like to share with you 3 ways in which you can make a start in tackling your own panic attacks and gradually regain control of your life.

 

Before I launch into the 3 tips I want to cover some old ground to set the foundation right for you. The first thing we must understand is who exactly these feelings on panic belong to. So ask yourself now “Who do these feelings of panic belong to?” Do you see that these feelings of panic belong to you? It’s your panic and your feelings. Recognising this represents a big first step in overcoming the anxiety. You see if you don’t know these feelings of panic belong to you, then you’ll always blame external events for you having panic. You’ll look everywhere bar yourself. 

 

So now step 1 is in place knowing who these feelings belong to we then need to delve deeper and look at what essentially panic is. Now panic as far as you and I are concerned is simply noise, it’s mind noise. That’s it. So now we know the panic belongs to us and it is just our mind making noise. We might not like it or agree with it but already we can see a little clearer. So now we’re ready for the 3 tips.

 

1)Daily Intention: Having a daily intention of what you are going to do during the day seems almost irrelevant. How does this help with my panic?? Well by having a clear idea as to what you are going to do during the day your mind is going to focus on that very thing. That’s important as we all know our minds love to wonder and play all those Hollywood blockbuster movies of destruction and chaos. A focused mind becomes clearer and more tamed. A mind left to wonder leads to complete anarchy and you and I both know all about that don’t we? So what do you want to do today? You can mope around and blame the world for how bad you feel and drive everyone mad or you can take control and live your life to the full. What would you like to do? Great so can you think of just 3 things you’d like to do today. Make them positive, exciting, uplifting. You might decide to go for a relaxing walk on the beach, read an engaging book, spend 20 minutes focusing on your goal and imagine achieving it. So what is it for you?

 

2)The Secret Of Mind Quiet: How would you like to save yourself thousands and let me show you the fastest way to getting free from panic, achieve greater well-being, get your goals and much more? Sound a plan… Well, what I’m about to share is something I only recently discovered and since then it has found it’s way into every session I conduct. Why? Because it works real quick. You see what they don’t tell you in the secret and in that plethora of self-help books is what the mind is and what quiet is. Now you are very familiar with your mind because you hang out with it every second of the day. However even amongst all the chaos in your life right now there have been fleeting glimpses of your true state, your natural state. It might surprise you to know that anxiety and the emotional state is un-natural. We weren’t born with emotions instead in our early formative years we made connections based upon certain emotional experiences. For example, we might start off with hating the sound of a bus air breaks because it scares us or makes us jump. Over time this ‘scared’ feeling get’s stronger as we begin to make deeper stronger connections with the bus and airbrakes. Then we take it further and paint every ‘loud’ noise with the same emotion and before you know it you have created a phobia response or severe fear. 

 

So what is our natural state? Well, that state is quietness of mind. It’s best described as the state where everything just works out fine. Our mind is quiet, we accept ourselves 100% and things just effortlessly work out for us. In a world of panic attacks, we may only achieve this state for very brief periods during the day. So the next question I get asked is: “What, you mean to tell me your big idea is to get a quiet mind and I’m never going to get a panic attack, anxiety or experience any negative emotion?” And my answer “ Yes, so long as you STAY in quiet you’ll never have any issue” 

 

Your mind might be kicking in now and thinking “There’s got to be more to it. I’ve got to figure this out. He doesn’t get my panic attacks. You can’t just get quiet and be free of it. It can’t be right…” Well, there’s a reason why I run London’s Leading Anxiety Clinic and that’s precisely because I know exactly what I’m talking about. I invite you as part of your daily morning routine to try out this little routine:

 

Step 1: As you wake up in the morning just sit up in your bed with eyes closed. Just focus on taking a deep relaxing breath in through your nose and out either through your nose or mouth, whichever is more comfortable for you.

 

Step 2: Think about achieving your goal. Focus on what you want and not the picture you don’t want. How does it feel to have it? Just notice all the sensations of having it.

 

Step 3: Now think about those positive beliefs you have now you have it. E.g. “I feel so relaxed and peaceful now” “I feel surrounded by the feeling of safety and security” “I am safe now” “I love myself now” You get the idea. These affirmations are another new thing I’ve discovered that work really well used in the right way.

 

Step 4: Begin to surrender all those feelings now to quiet and just go back to focus on your breathing. As soon as you feel centred and your head feels relaxed your good for the day. Every time you feel overwhelmed during the day just think back to the positive goal and you’ll lift yourself up. The more you stay positive the more your life will change for the better.

 

3) Momentum: The Key To Success

 

Momentum sounds like something associated with a boulder charging down a mountain and gaining ever increasing strength and power. In short, this analogy is perfect for why momentum is so important. Like a boulder charging down a mountain, it takes a bit of time for the boulder to reach its full speed and power. Like the boulder the more we practice and develop healthy habits of success the more power and strength we accumulate and the better and more abundant our lives are. In the beginning stages, it takes effort and a real push to get the boulder of success to topple on down the hill but once we achieve this we can ease off the pressure and just continue to repeat what worked for us the day before and in so doing grow and achieve ever greater levels of potential. So think about what action you can take today to take a step closer to achieving your goal. Is it sending an email  or a proposal off because you fear failure and rejection? Do something or forever be trapped within the paralysis of nothing. No action=No Results. Action=Feedback=Results. 

 

 

I hope these few tips have helped you and do please share this article and comment below. If you feel you'd like further support from me then why not get your free 30 minutes "Prove It Works: Get Anxiety Free" Session where I'll give you a taste of the magical state of quiet. I only have 3 spaces a week so get in touch with me now if you want in. I have successfully worked with people all over the world including the USA as we use zoom, a great way to chat using your computers video.

 

Published in Therapists Blog
Thursday, 18 December 2014 17:19

Persistent Thoughts

I think sometimes the hardest part of having Panic Disorder is the persistent thoughts...thinking about my anxiety, thinking about a panic attack, thinking about what I'd tell a doctor about my feelings and thoughts, thinking about making an appointment with a doctor to talk about it, thinking about thinking about it, thinking about what's causing it, thinking about having a serious panic attack in public, thinking about fainting in public, thinking about living with the anxiety and on and on.  My mind nearly always is running through mock scenarios in my mind of different situations and what I'd say or do.  It's like I'm obsessed with the one thing I want to forget.  I try to focus so much on not letting the panic in; not letting it win or control me.  I surpress it, and try to control it through sheer will power (which is not always easy).  I am a very stubborn, strong willed woman, and I will not let it run my life, nor will I let it control my actions.  I have stayed at work even through sometimes very severe panic attacks and worked through the day, all the while going through waves of heart pounding, hyperventilating, chest spasming feelings.  I can do this, but it seems I need to focus on focusing my thoughts elsewhere as well.

_Megan_

Published in Diary
Thursday, 18 December 2014 17:19

Persistent Thoughts

I think sometimes the hardest part of having Panic Disorder is the persistent thoughts...thinking about my anxiety, thinking about a panic attack, thinking about what I'd tell a doctor about my feelings and thoughts, thinking about making an appointment with a doctor to talk about it, thinking about thinking about it, thinking about what's causing it, thinking about having a serious panic attack in public, thinking about fainting in public, thinking about living with the anxiety and on and on.  My mind nearly always is running through mock scenarios in my mind of different situations and what I'd say or do.  It's like I'm obsessed with the one thing I want to forget.  I try to focus so much on not letting the panic in; not letting it win or control me.  I surpress it, and try to control it through sheer will power (which is not always easy).  I am a very stubborn, strong willed woman, and I will not let it run my life, nor will I let it control my actions.  I have stayed at work even through sometimes very severe panic attacks and worked through the day, all the while going through waves of heart pounding, hyperventilating, chest spasming feelings.  I can do this, but it seems I need to focus on focusing my thoughts elsewhere as well.

_Megan_

Published in Diary
Wednesday, 17 December 2014 20:36

Panic Attacks

I have been experiencing panic attacks since March of 2014.  I had my first panic attack while sitting in my car, on a break at work.  I was doing something innocuous like checking Facebook, and it hit me out of no where.  My heart was racing, breathing was difficult, I was dizzy and felt like my head was 'in a bubble'.  I remember clawing at my collar bone, feeling as if there was something there restricting my breath.  I went back into work and continued my day through the feelings which came in waves.  For the next 4 days I trudged through those feelings, thinking I was getting sick with a cold or something.  I even tried taking a cold medication thinking it was mucous in my lungs making me feel like I couldn't breath.  Taking this medication actually made me feel worse; I started panicing about taking a pill, and my symptoms worsened.  I also had a severe stabbing pain in my left shoulder blade, and I managed to find one random website online that indicated that that could be a symptom of a heart attack.  This only made me panic more, and again, my symptoms worsened.  I still had not at this point even thought that I was experiencing a panic attack.  Finally, when I could not walk more than 10 feet without having to sit down due to being dizzy and out of breath, I paniced, called my husband to come home from work, and went to Urgent Care (I did not have insurance at the time and did not want to pay out of pocket for something I was sure would pass).  I was doubled over in the waiting room, convinced that I was going to pass out.  The nurse came out and took my blood oxygen level, and I was fully oxygenated.  I finally met with a doctor, who told me I was having a four day long panic attack and perscribed Xanax.  My husband and I picked up dinner on the way home and I sat, staring at the pill, crying because I was so scared, until I finally took it.  I felt 150% better.  Everything was beautiful, I was on a fucking cloud lmao!  It really did wonders.

Since that attack, I've had one almost on the dot every other Wednseday, with a few peppered in between.  I have many mini ones as well where it feels as if a wave of anxiety hits me and then passes within a few minutes but they are not as severe as the heart racing, can't focus on anything else attacks.  The mini ones are usually triggered by a pain in my chest on various sides, usually attributable to gas or muscle spasms (but that doesn't stop the panic, does it?).  I try now to just recognize them as Panic Attacks and let them pass but it's not always easy.  I also found a questionnaire online that I fill out everytime I'm in the midst of an attack.  This helps me notice patterns and inconsistencies in my symptoms as well as helps me accuratly monitor the frequency of my attacks and mini attacks. 

Published in Diary
Thursday, 13 November 2014 03:57

Intelligence and Anxiety

I am not a stupid person, in fact I consider myself a smart girl that sometimes or usually does stupid stuff (depending on circumstance). My history of academic performance varies from high average to low, although I always score high on intelligence test or aptitude tests. Recently I just passed my first Licensure Exam, the one for Registered Psychometricians and I am very happy about it.

So I am going into the heart of my problem before this would sound like a shameless self-aggrandizing entry.

Ever since I have been experiencing panic anxiety, I have  been in a state of constant worry, primarily for my sanity. I have heard of those stories from my family and friends

about this person they knew or that one family member, that went a little astray with their mental health. Usually, I would hear, what a shame, she was smart that one, maybe became too smart.

And that always puts a chill in my heart, especially now that I am diagnosed with an actual mental disorder. 

Am I going to be one of those people? That went crazy because of being too smart? Should I stop reading, and stifle my curiosity about random things?

These thoughts make me depressed, and worried.

So I am just gonna break down here the reasons why I should not be worried, this serves to soothe me and anyone else who may be thinking the same thing.

1. I am not that smart, sure I have a nice fat vocabulary in Engilsh even though it is my second language, and know some stuff, but I am especially terrible at math.

2. Intelligence itself is not the cause of mental disorders, they are just correlated (and I am guessing here) because intelligent people think and people with mental disorders think way too much.

3. There are geniuses who have IQs that are out of this world, and they are fine, perhaps some quirks here or there but otherwise fine.

4. There are a lot of stupid people that do stupid stuff and you just KNOW they have a mental disorder.

5. I am not that smart.

 

 

 

 

Published in Diary
Sunday, 09 November 2014 12:25

Intrusive Thoughts that Scares Me Dizzy

I've been bothered by intrusive thoughts lately and they are not your run-of-the-mill brain farts. They're the kind of thoughts that when it crossed you it will make you go ''What the f*ck was that about?'', ''Oh, gross'' or just plain ''No.'' pair that with anxiety and you got yourself one hell of a horror ride.

Fortunately, they do go away, and your logical sense, and maybe even your sense of humor will rise above this distressing thoughts.

Mine started when I was about to go to sleep, I remember that I was feeling pretty tense already and one thought popped into my head ''I think I'm going crazy''. My body immediately responded with an increased heart rate and further anxious thinking about going nuts. I went downstairs to see who I could talk to and expected it to be my brother as he is a night owl. I told him what was happening.

Unfortunately my brother is very skilled at being a douche to me and told me scoffed at me and ignored me. From then on the intrusive thoughts have varied from afraid of bieng Schizophrenic, Suicidal, Incestuous, Murderous, and Ridiculous. Now, I would like to elaborate what triggered them so we can see how what anxiety does to you, how it blows everything out of proportion

The Schizophrenic fear I acquired when  I was studying for the Psychometrician Licensure Exam (I passed by the way), and the topics involved abnormal psychology, so there we go.

The Suicidal fear is given, I am aware of my current vulnerability given that I had a history of depression and suicidal ideation.

The Incest fear, I got this when I was watching the movie ''The Dreamers'' which has a semi-incestuous theme, since I was still pissed at my brother for being a douch, I was horrified at the incest and so intrusive thoughts of my incest wth bro ensued. Which is really gross.

The Murderous fear, I had a brief intrusive thought with me wanting to hurt or kill my family, but thinking about it now makes me sad.

The Ridiculous fear, most recently I had the fear of my mom or my family finding out that I don't believe in God. I was afraid that she will blame me for my Panic Anxiety because I don't believe in him and that is the cause of my suffering, that I am being punished for my atheism.

With respect to those with religious beliefs.

I was so scared that I tried to pray but it just made it worse cause believing in a god is just as ridiculous as my fears.

I've known about Schizophrenia before but I only got scared of it now, I've been suicidal before but I only got scared I would do it now, I've known my brother for as long as I remember but I only got scared of incest now. I've entertained the thought of hurting my family when I was angry but I only got scared of it now. I have been an atheist for three years now but I only got scared about it now.

The facts are, I am not a Schizophrenic, I am not suicidal anymore and I want to live, I am not sexually attracted to my brother, I don't want to kill or hurt my family, I love them, and I wouldn't want to hurt them even if I didnt love them, and I dont believe in God.

It's tough having this problem. It helps when I'm able to verbalize these thoughts and feelings, take them apart and separate the me from the anxiety. Of course, that's easier said than done, especially when you are currently experiencing the intrusive thoughts, leading to a panic attack.

The last time this happened to me (a couple or so hours ago) I was drunk with fear, unable to think straight. Trying my hardest to ignore, supress, and laugh off the intrusive, irrational, anxiety-induced thoughts.

It lasted throughout the day and it ended up with  my heart rate reaching 121 per minute, I just let the feelings come through and breathed into a paper bag until, gradually, I felt better.

It ends, and I continue living.

 

 

 

Published in Anxiety General Blog
Monday, 30 September 2013 01:33

Too young to suffer

This is my first entry, so I suppose I'll do a bit of an introduction, as well as a summary of my current state of anxiety. The reason my title is too young to suffer is because I am 22 years old and I have so much anxiety in my life, I can't get over it. It was first noted by doctors when I was 3 that I had OCD tendencies so I guess I was born this way. I've had very differing levels of anxiety and panic throughout my life. Middle school was awful (but then again, when isn't middle school awful!?). High school was great. My first year of college was a bit of a bump-but only because my roommate told everyone I was crazy and had panic disorder (this quickly blew over when everyone realized she was the crazy one...). I succeeded amazingly in college, even with a job and an internship. I have never had any problem meeting and maintaining friendships, I've been in one long-term romantic relationships, and a lot of dates since then. So I often say...if this life were given to anyone else (without all this anxiety, panic, OCD thought pattern...) they would be monumentally happy. And don't get me wrong-I have been very happy, but it's times like now when I wonder how I could be happy without a happy pill. 

 

My doctor recently cut off my panic medication, and I readily agreed to it. I was beaming from college graduation and ready to greet the world with open arms. I hadn't had a panic attack in years and figured I was ready to go off of it-I just had gone through major life changes, 2 surgeries, been diagnosed with chronic migraine...yea I could do this. The withrawal was interesting, but nothing I couldn't handle. I did fine, no panic, low anxiety. That is, until I started my new job. My chest has not loosened since I started my new job. The lump in my throat has not disappeared. My chronic migraine is pretty bad since I started my new job. Part of the reason things are rough is because I'm living with my parents and my mentally challenged brother. I love my family, but they don't totally have healthy ways of living (I mean mentally-the house is a mess, they procrastinate, don't communicate well). And this has increased my anxiety like you wouldn't believe. I'm still dirt poor so there's no way I can move out anytime soon. I'm paranoid about work-about messing up, making a mistake and getting fired. I know somewhere there is the person (the real me!) who is confident, vibrant, pain-free, worry-free, and ready to give to the world, but I cannot get through this wall. Even relaxation techniques are a bust. Also, note that I am on a high level of anti-depressant for the OCD, and this is the only one that doesn't cause me to have seizures. Yes...I am only 22, tell me about it!

Published in Diary
Wednesday, 31 July 2013 02:54

When will i learn?

I Consider myself to be a smart person. But even after so many years having Anxiety/Panic attacks i still find myself worrying that it really is a heart attack. I know that must be the "Fight or Flight" Response but it still is scary everytime! I have this fear that after so many years of having these Panic attacks that my heart must be worn out from them, that maybe the next panic attack will be the heart attack.  

I hate Heart Palpitations. But the Cardiologist says my heart is fine. I am plus sized but i am working to change that. i think my weight is contributing to my anxiety very much. No excuses..I love food. i know even if i am average weight i would still love food. i just have to make better food choices and stick to that and plan my meals. I am also a pop addict. :( yes soda's..my favorite soda pop is coca cola. Yes it has caffiene. but in my mind i tell myself if i have heart palpitations i blame the pop. So why is this a never ending cycle? that is where CBT comes in to play. i know i am better now than ever before because changing thoughts and habits. But if you start reading this again you will think not really. i am still a work in progress But i am not as bad as i was in the beginning when my anxiety started in my teens. i was very housebound, always needing another adult around and have a car outside just incase and they better have a mobile phone! Yes that was me. I now am a mother of 3 and a stay at home mom..in my own house. i go out and take my kids for walks and i occassionally meet with friends and socialize..So yes CBT helped me. and i love my life despite the occassional anxiety/panic attack. 

I can do this. I just have to be determined and keep trying. i hope you reading this will find peace and calm for yourself.

Much love and light.

-Melissa

 

Published in Diary
Tuesday, 07 May 2013 00:27

Day One of the Forum

 

Day One of the Forum

 

My Background:

Episode 1: As a teenager I was a professional singer. I was raised to be a rock star, basically. I wasn't famous or anything but made pretty good money. My father was a brilliant guitarist who was in the band with me. I had the best music equipment and was able to work with brilliant musicians (all much older than me). After I graduated high school I went to Berklee College of Music in Boston. When I came home for my first summer break (Lincoln, NE) my father was arrested for embezzlement. It seems that's how he was funding my music career and college. The first panic attacked I had was in 1999, shortly before my 21st birthday. My father was just sentenced to prison I did not have the money to continue school in Boston. I was quite the pot head and suddenly I had panic attacks anytime I smoked. So I did the rational thing and quit smoking weed. It worked. No more panic attacks. I lived my life as normal, working, writing, hanging out with friends. When I was 24 I decided to go back to college for something entirely different. (Before it was music, now it was ancient literature and religion). One semester in my apartment burned down and I lost everything. I had a difficult time, but in general I was fine.

Published in Diary

well its been about 3 months since my very first panic attack and my introduction into the world of anxiety. i want to go back but it seems to be hard. i recovered twice in the past 2 months or at least i thought i was recovering. the first time i thought it was over, i was so happy to be myself again and then things start to get bad again. hand numbness and tingling, i felt so disappointed in myself as if i let myself down. the anxiety came back but this time i was scared of having a disease. every little head pain worried me, every tingle, every numb sensation. my face, my arms, my hands and feet you name it. although ive seemed to get over the feeling of 'The fear of fear" (i think) i now have a new foe i have to combat against, its health anxiety. i didnt feel this way the 1st month and a half of having anxiety. i was just scared something with set off a panic attack, i hated the feeling i had in the pit of my stomach. now im worried im sick, mentally ill, tumors, multiple sclerosis, bell's palsy. yea ive been looking up way too much online and maybe i should stop. i guess my online research has evolved as well. from anxiety help to 'whats this a symptom of, whats that a symptom of?" and the many things that come up are almost overwhelming. i hope i really am okay, i hope i can get past this feeling too and even more so i hope the fear stays away. 

Published in Diary
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